Celebrating Epiphany

We’re weird. And we stick with that for how we celebrate Christmas, too.

First, we’re not Catholic. Second, we sometimes celebrate Catholic holidays. It makes sense.

So we celebrate the 12 days of Christmas, and that ends on January 6, Epiphany, the day that celebrates the magi’s visit to Jesus.

Little lesson here. Bill is insanely particular that the wise men are at a distance from the manger instead of in the scene. As in they’re on their way but not there. That’s because most likely Jesus was around two by the time they got there, not in a manger anymore. Hence Harod commanding the death of all boys two and under instead of just infant boys. So Epiphany is 12 days after Christmas to try to depict that.

We don’t open any presents on Christmas morning, only stockings. Then the kids open presents every day leading up to Epiphany, reflecting the gifts the magi brought. Not every kid every day, but at least one present every day.

Then for Epiphany, we save up so that everyone gets one last gift to open, and I bake a king’s cake, complete with a plastic baby hidden inside. The finder of the baby gets an additional small gift. This is to show that the real gift, the best of them all, is Jesus himself.

Our family has enjoyed this holiday for years, a simple way to continue the celebration of God come down with us.

Oh, and it’s very important that all Christmas decorations come down January 7th, cause this mama can only take Christmasy things in the time period of the day after Thanksgiving until Epiphany. It’s a law. And all members of my household who attempt to violate this law give up all rights and provisions of my household, you know, things like food. At this point the kids begin referring to Christmas as the C-word, because it’s pretty much cussing outside these times. We’re a split household with this law. The man believes every day is Christmas. He’s a lawbreaker, so don’t do as he does.

 

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A Friend’s Review of The Connected Child

In our recent series on the adoption, I included a pretty lengthy critique of The Connected Child, the book which serves as a bit of an adoption bible in Christian circles. In the midst of posting those, my good pastor friend Brian Liechty let me know he had also been working on a review of the book (separately from anything I’d written) since so many folks in his church were using it as a resource. As a pastor, he was also concerned about many elements in the book. After we talked a bit about it, he told me he was considering submitting it to CCEF for their journal. I even got the privilege of reading an early version of the review.

I’m glad to say that Brian did submit the review to CCEF and they did decide to publish it. And it’s a really great review. Brian does an excellent job of laying out both the many strengths and weaknesses of the book, in a far more winsome and transparent and encouraging way than I did in my reviews (and I feel no shame in admitting that!). Brian wrote it with a pastor’s heart, wanting the flock over which the Holy Spirit has made him an overseer to be well cared for and informed in the ways they used this resource for the glory of God. And he was kind enough to share that heart with the rest of us via CCEF’s journal.

So, if you’re not getting this, I think if you have any experience with or interest in The Connected Child, you really ought to read Brian’s review. Unfortunately, you do have to buy either the entire journal or the single article to read it. But if you buy the article, it’s only $1.99 and totally worth it. To whet your appetite, here’s a free sample of the review.

New Year’s Time Capsule

Several years ago, we started having everyone fill out a time capsule at the end of the year. I cannot tell you how glad I am we did! Those memories, seeing how the kids (and us!) have changed through the years, going back to the little years to read together, all brings much laughter and tears when it comes time for it again. This is one of the kids’ favorite activities.

Here’s a copy of the form Bill made if you want to print it or use it as an idea to make your own:

Happy 2017, Everyone! We’re so thankful for each of you who take the time to read our mumblings on here. We pray your year is blessed.

HT: kcparent