Kids and Sleep

20160724_160613000_iosOur sweet friend, Leia, who we made a makeshift bed for during our gathering one Sunday.

When I first had Liam, my mentor gave me the best advice on practical parenting I’d had before or since–make sleep the biggest priority for your kids.

Thank you, thank you, oh Yoda. Your words have served our family well.
(Her name isn’t actually Yoda…)

Her philosophy was that most behavior problems in children come from a lack of sleep. I’m far too lazy to look up any research to back her up, but trust me, beyond a shadow of a doubt, she was right. OK, OK, theologically their behavior problems come from sinful heart issues. But we’re body and soul together, where our flesh affects our hearts and our hearts affect our flesh. It goes both ways.

For instance, there are many times my physical body is broken down, maybe from hunger or fatigue, and sometimes the gift God gives you to fight temptations that invariably increase during those times is to simply eat something or take a nap. Same for our little ones, even though they can’t quite evaluate this for themselves. Sleep is an important tool to help our kids, even the littles, fight the temptations that come from living in our sinful flesh.

Now, before I tell you how the Bells have handled sleep so far, remember that kids aren’t robots. None of our children fit into a perfect box here. I know you’ll hate this, but you just have to use the instincts God gave you according to each child’s needs.

Also, as I’m preparing to write this, I’m thinking, “Oh crap! I don’t actually remember what we did with babies!” I’ve done the baby and sleep thing six times, and my youngest is only four, but yeah–you really do forget. This should let you know how helpful this article will be. Please excuse me while I refresh my memory a bit…

And I’m back! I’m sure you noticed my absence.

(The recommended hours of sleep are in parentheses beside each age, according to WebMD)

Newborns-4 Weeks (15-16 hours): During these first weeks, we do a mix of feeling out baby’s rhythms and helping them adjust to ours. We typically do a feed-keep awake for a short time to play-sleep routine. If baby wakes up before three hours, I feed them and start the cycle over again. If they try to sleep longer at this age, I wake them up at the three-hour mark from start of the previous feeding. We do the same through the night, too. Our experience has been that baby stretches closer to the three-hour mark if we really try for the play time right after the feeding. I have no idea why (WebMD should totally hire me to write for them with all my research), but baby just seems to sleep better when they’ve played a bit before naptime.

1-4 Months (14-15 hours): There’s a slow transition that begins here to let baby begin sleeping through the night. We gradually allow baby to have longer stretches during the night until their body adjusts to full nighttime sleeping. For our six kids whom we raised from birth, 10-12 hour stretches happened between weeks 9 and 11. That’s not right or better or anything–it’s just what our kids did. If your kids don’t, they’re still awesome and so are you. We still wake them up in the daytime if need be, we just switch to more of a four-hour instead of three-hour cycle.

4-9 Months (14-15 hours): At this point, our kids were on a schedule of three naps during the day, usually sleeping between 1-2 hours at a time and 10-12 hours at night. We still kept the same eat-play-sleep cycle with them. Dropping the third nap is different for each child. Two of my kids have always LOVED their sleep. Honestly, my ten-year-old could still nap every day if I wanted her to. They tended to hold on to that third nap longer than the others. If over time they simply don’t sleep, stop acting tired before the evening nap, or stop sleeping well through the night, it’s often an indication they need fewer naps. Dropping the evening nap can also means a bit of an earlier bed time for a transition period.

6-12 Months (14-15 hours): Our children still take two naps during this phase, and often we let this phase go longer than the 12 month recommendation, sometimes as late as 18 months. Again, it depends on the child’s needs. Twelve-hour nights of sleep are usually the sweet spot for Bell kids at this point.

1-3 Years (12-14 hours): Like I said, we often keep two naps past the one year mark, but most kids can switch to one nap a day not long after their first birthday.Our kids still sleep around twelve continuous hours during the night.

3-6 Years (10-12 hours): This is the point we usually start to look a bit different from other families. It seems like most families are anxious for their children to drop their afternoon nap so they can have more freedom to run errands, explore, whatever in the day. We typically don’t drop it until they’ve made it through this phase. Threenagers’ little bodies are changing so much, and it’s rough to make it 12 hours with no rest. Now, a couple of my kids did stop napping consistently when they were three, but I haven’t had one who was ready to drop completely at this age. This is where “rest time” becomes more the norm. They would read books in bed for an hour or two. A few days a week, they fall asleep, and a few days a week they don’t. Currently, one of my four-year-olds could take a four-hour nap each day if we’d let him (we don’t!), our other four-year-old sleeps 5-6 days a week, and our five-year-old sleeps 2-4 days a week.

7-12 Years (10-11 hours): We gradually let our children stay up a bit longer during this phase, pushing bedtime back by 30 minutes as the child grows. Our 11-year-old goes to bed around 9 and wakes up on his own between 7 and 7:30. He did recently get a late Friday night bedtime of 10:00, and he’ll usually sleep a bit later on Saturdays. This basically means he stays up later than me most Fridays. Dang, I’m a party animal…

12-18 Years (8-9 hours): No words here. I haven’t raised a cub in this age range yet. I just thought it was fun to include it like I have a clue what I’m doing.

One last thought here. I don’t believe in a child-centered home. Nor do I believe in a parent-centered home. I believe in a Jesus-centered home, which entails giving up your own desires as your Big Brother did. I mentioned this briefly above, but the biggest reason it seems parents push their kids out of the sleep they need (I do it, too!) is because we’re just weary of revolving our schedules around our kids. We’re ready for an easier season where we can add in activities we’ve missed or look forward to. Or we want more freedom to do things on our time for our convenience. Sometimes, the right thing is to blow off a nap or drop naps for necessity. But I think more often we need to remember that rest is a precious gift from God. It’s good for our kids, and it’s good for us. Sit and be still, knowing this season is from him and for him. Use their rest time to be content in this season. And if you do this well, let me know in the comments. I would love to learn from you.

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Summer Break!!!

Here’s a tip–don’t forget a word. If your premature baby spends a month in the hospital, don’t start school within a week of coming home for no reason even though it’s too early and you’re not prepared and you have a pump or baby on your boob every ninety minutes. Tell your husband or a trusted friend to slap your hormones silly and remind you you’ll be temporarily out of your mind until the sleep deprivation is over.

When you don’t listen to them through your hormone-infested-sleep-deprived ears, know that you’ll get to be on summer break in the middle of May the following year! The ends justify the means, right?!

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Last year, I started to list our summer weekly agendas. Somehow, babies have a way of messing with all our plans, don’t they? (Speaking of that baby, Ariana just saw him and called him Joey–cause Josiah isn’t good enough I guess…) I’ll make another attempt at it this year, but there are no promises when kids are involved.

Here’s our daily schedule. I left off specific times for the sake of all you stalkers out there–this is simply an order of events:

Breakfast, Bible, Chores, Play Outside
Fun Activity
Lunch, Phonics for Pre-K
Rest, Big Kids Read, Practice Piano, and Do Flashcards
Free Play
Habit Training
Family Time
Bed

Here’s a general outline of the fun activities I have planned:

Monday–Park
Tuesday–Home Camp (theme based craft, book, music, movie, food, etc.)
Wednesday–Outing
Thursday–Water Play, Art Lesson and Science Experiment
Friday–Free Day

This week, we plan to visit Christian Park and the Indianapolis Firefighter Museum. Summer!!!

Managing Several Small Children

It’s really not surprising to anyone–managing a family with several small children presents a number of unique challenges.  And it’s pretty obvious most people are aware of this considering the unending comments we get about how many littles we have.  As with many things, there are overlapping layers of complexity that go into making our family of eight work like the well-oiled machine hobbling contraption held together by MacGyver’s duct tape that we are.

We’d like to take the next handful of posts to talk about some of the principles and tactics we manage our multiples.  This will run the gamut from handling the older kids while, say, nursing an infant (as you might imagine, Court will cover that one) to interacting with all the kids at the same time while they compete over who gets to talk next.

As we dig into this discussion, we invite your feedback and corrections.  We’d especially love to hear what you do with your families–we know we don’t have a monopoly on effective parenting techniques.  And please, you don’t have to have “greater than or equal to” the number of kids we have to make suggestions.  No matter the age or number of your kids, we want to hear from you.

Here are the four sections we have planned right now.  If there’s something y’all think of that we’re not covering, let us know and we’ll pull it onto this discussion.

  • Keeping kids occupied while hands are tied
  • Working with kids who are on different levels
  • Handling kids while on outings
  • Group activities